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Current events have me thinking back to my time as an undergraduate student and being a part of the divest from South Africa movement. I learned well at that time that money talks the loudest, and the scale of the divestment movement against apartheid in South Africa was brilliant: entertainers and athletes refusing to play there, college students convincing their institutions to divest, individuals and families choosing not to buy products exported from South Africa. And ultimately, it led to the toppling of the apartheid regime. I wish we could mobilize on this scale right now.

Over the years, my own children have rolled their eyes at me when I have refused to order from the local sandwich shop chain or the take-and-bake pizza chain because the ways that those companies moved did not align with my values. It has been a small and imperfect way of using my wallet to vote. I smile now when I hear news about how a big chain coffee shop and global fast food chain are being impacted by current grass roots boycotts.

As climate justice activists, we may be working within the complexities and realities of spending green (shoot, I still sometimes order from Amazon – none of us are perfect), and then I recently saw this graph:

It gave me pause.

Of course, I always knew that the money I deposit into my – or our organization’s – bank account doesn’t just sit there. Banking institutions use our money for investments and loans to other companies, including fossil fuel companies.

Now I understand that one of the levers we can pull to combat climate change is to take our money out of banks that invest in fossil fuels. Because as long as people profit from this industry we will never phase it out. So, I am looking at resources like Bank.Green and Bank for Good to find banking opportunities free of fossil fuel investments. This research is just one step I take to untangling myself from the fossil fuel industry. One step at a time toward the just transition.

Where do you bank? Better yet, where does your bank invest your dollars?

Susan Phillips

Susan Phillips
Executive Director

The post Where You Bank Matters appeared first on Climate Generation.

Where You Bank Matters

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Low Wages and Health Risks Are Crippling the U.S. Wildland Firefighting Forces

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Federal agencies are struggling to maintain firefighting brigades during some of the worst fire seasons in history.

At the end of February, a curtain of flames engulfed the Texas Panhandle, eventually marking the state’s largest wildfire in history. The blaze was merciless, burning through more than 1 million acres of land and swallowing houses whole. 

Low Wages and Health Risks Are Crippling the U.S. Wildland Firefighting Forces

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International Debt Is Strangling Developing Nations Vulnerable to Climate Change, a New Report Shows

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Many small island nations which contributed little to climate change now must borrow money to rebuild after climate-induced storms. The debt service they’re carrying hinders their ability to invest in new adaptive infrastructure before the next storms hit.

Small island developing countries are increasingly becoming locked into a cycle of environmental disasters and compounding debt burdens, making them less capable of investing in climate resilient infrastructure and providing basic public services, according to a new report scheduled for partial release on Wednesday.

International Debt Is Strangling Developing Nations Vulnerable to Climate Change, a New Report Shows

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How Do Neighbors of Solar Farms Really Feel? A New Survey Has Answers

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Overall sentiment is positive, but swings toward negative for people living close to the largest projects.

For people living within three miles of a large solar farm, positive attitudes about the development outnumber negative ones by about a three-to-one margin, according to a new national survey released this week by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

How Do Neighbors of Solar Farms Really Feel? A New Survey Has Answers

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